Sunday, November 22, 2015

Kai Patterson’s $65.5 Million Television Deal Will Make Him One Of The Highest Paid Television Series Stars

Immediate Release:  A pending agreement is being prepared that will increase the existing deal to over $98 Million before bonuses.

Last week, Kai Patterson received confirmation from his attorney that his $65,520,000 television deal had been executed to profile special child support cases for his Project Child Support initiative.  The deal will make Kai Patterson among the highest paid television series stars in the world, before any ratings bonuses.  Although sitcom stars among the highest paid, and Patterson's show is not a sitcom, Patterson’s deal would put him 18th on the   highest paid sitcom stars  for 2015 - 2016 if it were.  Unlike most television stars and those on the list below, Patterson will also own his series, which enables him to be fully compensated for each redistribution of the series.  "I would not even consider a deal where I would not own  the series produced on my own company.  Since our show will discuss real cases, we needed to control the content to maintain client privileges and to ensure proprietary information that may jeopardize cases would not be divulged," says Kai Patterson.

Highest Paid Stars Annually In A Similar Genre  (2015 – 2016)


Kai Patterson’s current deal put’s him between 6th and 7th place on the list of the highest paid stars within his genre, provided above by 'TheRichest.com'. Patterson was notified an additional deal is forthcoming.  The pending deal would increase his total deal to $98,280,000 over 5 years, before any ratings bonuses.  The additional deal would pay Kai Patterson an average of $19,656,000 per year before bonuses; making him the 3rd highest paid star on the above list. “Being anywhere on this list is a dream come true.  I am not counting the additional deal, until it is inked and signed of by all parties.  The additional agreement is being prepared and will be reviewed by my entertainment attorney.  What is great about the existing contract and the additional agreement are the payments are guaranteed, says Patterson.

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(C) Copyright 2015 by Project Child Support

FOR MORE INFORMATION, PARENTS MAY CONTACT
Project Child Support at (855) 851-HELP or (855) 851-4357

Thursday, November 19, 2015

Kai Patterson Says His $65 Million Television Deal Is Attributed To His Late Mother, Who Raised Him As A Single Parent



Immediate Release:  A Special Tribute To Kai Patterson's Mother Will Be Included Premier Episode. 

Kai Patterson and His Mother
Recently, Project Child Support announced that Kai Patterson and the company received a $65 Million Television Deal that profiles selected child support cases related to the dilemmas that mothers and fathers face in America.
Although he has no children, Patterson was raised by a single parent mother, who never received child support from his father.  Project Child Support and the Custodial Support Foundation were created by Kai Patterson in honor of his mother to assist custodial and noncustodial parents with child support dilemmas.


Douglas and Harrison Apartments
Long before the Child Support Recovery Act of 1992  that provides legislation to enforcement the payment of child support, Kai Patterson's mother, Brenda Patterson, who later remarried and became Brenda West, struggled to make ends meet without any child support from Patterson's father. Patterson was born in the Grand St. Projects in Paterson, NJ and his mother moved to Newark, NJ when Patterson was 2-year-old. For years his mother struggled financially while raising him in the central and south wards of Newark.  "I was fortunate that both sets of my grandparents allowed me to stay with them during the weekends and summer months, which enabled me to experience living in marital households.  Staying with my grandparents also provided a relief from the threat of crime I experienced as a child.  My mother's struggle has enabled me to have an intense understanding of the struggle of being a single parent, which I vowed never to be, or be responsible for causing a woman to become, says Patterson.

Carmel Towers
Patterson spent most of his early childhood years living in the Douglas and Harrison Apartment, which was located in the Central Ward of Newark, NJ. The apartment complex sat in the center of several crime infested, and low income housing projects, which were known as Stella WrightScudder HomesHayes HomesHill Manor, and Brick Towers. Eventually each housing unit was closed and turndown.  When Patterson was 11-years-old, his mother moved to Carmel Towers, which was located in the South Ward of Newark.  When Patterson went away to college at Hampton University, his mother remarried and moved out of Newark.  "I was happy that my mother finally met the man of her dreams, and was able to live the life she always wished we could live," says Patterson.  Recently, Carmel Towers closed, it became a crime infested building.

In 2007, Patterson mother passed away, and the television series will enable the initiative to provide additional services for parents with child support challenges.  "I only wish she were alive to see what her sacrifices have motivated me to create in her honor, and the single parents across the nation with child support dilemmas.  When I created the initiative, I had no idea I would receive a television opportunity of this magnitude.  With the number of children being born out of wedlock, and the divorce rate, unpaid child support is at an all-time high, and exceeds over $100 billion.  We had an agreement between us that I would never have a child with a women and not marry that woman.  I have honored our agreement, and to this day I don't have any children.  I must say that it does bother me that did not have the right person in my life to give her a grandchild before she passed away.  Perhaps that is also why I am so passionate about helping children." says Patterson.

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Facebook: http://on.fb.me/1lPJ6Uv

(C) Copyright 2015 by Project Child Support

FOR MORE INFORMATION, PARENTS MAY CONTACT
Project Child Support at (855) 851-HELP or (855) 851-4357